Nº. 1 of  95

wear sunscreen

"We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing." — Maria Mitchell

But when from a long-distant past nothing subsists, after the people are dead, after the things are broken and scattered, still, alone, more fragile, but with more vitality, more unsubstantial, more persistent, more faithful, the smell and taste of things remain poised a long time, like souls, ready to remind us, waiting and hoping for their moment, amid the ruins of all the rest; and bear unfaltering, in the tiny and almost impalpable drop of their essence, the vast structure of recollection.

Marcel Proust

I wish it need not have happened in my time,” said Frodo.
“So do I,” said Gandalf, “and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.

Tolkein, Lord of the Rings

awkwardsituationist:

"world of averages" - composite images culled from thousands of individual portraits resulting in symmetrical average faces

The internal structure of precious opal makes it diffract light; depending on the conditions in which it formed it can take on many colors. Precious opal ranges from clear through white, gray, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, magenta, rose, pink, slate, olive, brown, and black. Of these hues, the reds against black are the most rare, whereas white and greens are the most common. It varies in optical density from opaque to semi-transparent. (via Finding the Ocean Inside an Opal «TwistedSifter)

The internal structure of precious opal makes it diffract light; depending on the conditions in which it formed it can take on many colors. Precious opal ranges from clear through white, gray, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, magenta, rose, pink, slate, olive, brown, and black. Of these hues, the reds against black are the most rare, whereas white and greens are the most common. It varies in optical density from opaque to semi-transparent. (via Finding the Ocean Inside an Opal «TwistedSifter)

ifuckingloveminerals:

Black Boulder Opal

Quilpie, Queensland, Australia

|x|x|

graceandcompany:

♥LIKE : Manuel Cosentino ” Italian photographer Manuel Cosentino shot the same subject from the same angel for nearly two years. The resultant body of work, titled ‘Behind Little House’, reveals how a simple subject assumes a complex narrative with the help of Nature. “

graceandcompany:

♥LIKE : Manuel Cosentino
” Italian photographer Manuel Cosentino shot the same subject from the same angel for nearly two years. The resultant body of work, titled ‘Behind Little House’, reveals how a simple subject assumes a complex narrative with the help of Nature. “

(Source: quillshiv, via actegratuit)

"Patronizing storytelling has been damaging to the psyche of Bangladeshis and to the economy,” he said. “Photos of Bangladesh have been used to propagate a colonial view of the world, and as a result, Bangladesh is only known for poverty and disaster.”
Mr. Alam acknowledges that poverty is part of the story of his country, but when reportage focuses only on poverty, he says, it presents a narrow view. Rarely is the country’s rich culture and art portrayed by the Western media or the foreign photographers working with them.”
It’s ironic how the article is around the theme of battling orientalist-type narratives but NYtimes’s lens blog or Mr Alam himself chose to highlight in its slideshow of 14 images, mainly scenes of poverty and disaster except for the token image of the floating forest above. Hmph. 
(via Wresting the Narrative From the West - NYTimes.com)

"Patronizing storytelling has been damaging to the psyche of Bangladeshis and to the economy,” he said. “Photos of Bangladesh have been used to propagate a colonial view of the world, and as a result, Bangladesh is only known for poverty and disaster.”

Mr. Alam acknowledges that poverty is part of the story of his country, but when reportage focuses only on poverty, he says, it presents a narrow view. Rarely is the country’s rich culture and art portrayed by the Western media or the foreign photographers working with them.”

It’s ironic how the article is around the theme of battling orientalist-type narratives but NYtimes’s lens blog or Mr Alam himself chose to highlight in its slideshow of 14 images, mainly scenes of poverty and disaster except for the token image of the floating forest above. Hmph. 

(via Wresting the Narrative From the West - NYTimes.com)

Until the lions find their storytellers, stories about hunting will always glorify the hunter

African Saying

actegratuit:

photo © Theron Humphrey

Maddie on Things

on tumblr

actegratuit:

Watercolor Paintings by Anna Armona

Nº. 1 of  95